American Salon April 2012 : Page-106

Sydney Guilaroff, chief stylist for MGM Studios, surrounded by the wigs he designed for I Married an Angel (1942) 106 American Salon April 2012 PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY IMAGES You may not know his name, but you know his work. As chief hairdresser for MGM Studios from 1934 until well into the 1970s, Sydney Guilaroff was arguably the first celebrity hairstylist. Lucille Ball, Hollywood’s most famous redhead, was just another blonde until she met Guilaroff, and Judy Garland had him to thank for Dorothy’s braids. No wonder he was the first to receive a screen credit for hairdressing. Guilaroff’s influence reached beyond the back lot. Like so many other great hairdressers, he became both the friend and confidant of many clients, including Elizabeth Taylor and Marilyn Monroe. He gave a command performance for Grace Kelly, flying to Monaco to style the soon-to-be princess’ hair for her wedding to Prince Rainier III, and sat with a bedridden Joan Crawford the night she won the Oscar for Mildred Pierce (1945). Guilaroff died in 1997 at the age of 89, but his legacy will live on in revival movie houses and the flickering blue light of the classic film channel. ✂ —Karen Ford Sydney Guilaroff

History Makers

Karen Ford

<br /> Sydney Guilaroff<br /> <br /> You may not know his name, but you know his work. As chief hairdresser for MGM Studios from 1934 until well into the 1970s, Sydney Guilaroff was arguably the first celebrity hairstylist. Lucille Ball, Hollywood’s most famous redhead, was just another blonde until she met Guilaroff, and Judy Garland had him to thank for Dorothy’s braids. No wonder he was the first to receive a screen credit for hairdressing. Guilaroff’s influence reached beyond the back lot. Like so many other great hairdressers, he became both the friend and confidant of many clients, including Elizabeth Taylor and Marilyn Monroe. He gave a command performance for Grace Kelly, flying to Monaco to style the soon-to-be princess’ hair for her wedding to Prince Rainier III, and sat with a bedridden Joan Crawford the night she won the Oscar for Mildred Pierce (1945). Guilaroff died in 1997 at the age of 89, but his legacy will live on in revival movie houses and the flickering blue light of the classic film channel. ✂ —Karen Ford

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