American Salon June 2012 : Page 30

Lead stylist Camille Friend used a custom-made top piece to enhance Russell Brand’s (left) spiky crop seen in this shot with Julianne Hough and Alec Baldwin, who is wearing a graying wig inspired by Kris Kristofferson circa 1979. ROCK THIS WAY The club scene of Hollywood, CA’s Sunset Strip in 1987 is the setting for Rock of Ages , the latest Broadway jukebox musical to make its way to the silver screen. Set against a backdrop of drugs, sex and rock ’n’ roll, Rock of Ages tells the story of small-town girl Sherrie Christian, played by Julianne Hough, and busboy Drew Boley (Diego Boneta) as they pursue their dreams of attaining rock stardom and true love. The sound track is populated by songs from iconic ’80s groups like Foreigner, Journey and Twisted Sister, part of a sub-genre often referred to as “hair bands” for reasons which will be obvious to any audience member too young to remember those days. “In 1987, I was in beauty school in Tempe, AZ,” says the movie’s hair department head Camille Friend. No doubt perms were a big part of the curriculum back then, but no members of the cast, which also 30 American Salon June 2012 The new movie musical Rock of Ages explores life on the Sunset Strip when heavy metal was big—and so was the hair. includes Tom Cruise, Alec Baldwin, Russell Brand and Catherine Zeta-Jones, had to undergo anything quite so drastic. “We used more than 400 wigs,” Friend says. “Bob Kretschmer did all the custom lace-front wigs for our main cast. We used John Blake wigs for day players and stunts.” Each character had a distinctive look— some more than one. “Julianne’s character had the most changes,” Friend explains. “She went from farm girl to waitress at a rock bar to stripper and then to rock star. I made many hairpieces, ponytails and extensions to create her looks. We used pictures of Farrah Fawcett and Suzanne Somers as character references.” Cruise plays Stacee Jaxx, a rocker whose look and attitude were inspired by Guns N’ Roses front man Axl Rose. Friend used a three-quarter hairpiece to create volume and add length to Cruise’s natural hair. Mary J. Blige also makes an appearance as a rock diva in a Chaka Khan-inspired Afro wig so big it deserves its own billing. Much of the action takes place onstage, with the requisite sweating under hot lights and leaping onto amps. Since it’s a musical, even scenes that weren’t at concerts involve lots of dancing, a liability when working with wigs. “It’s always challenging to apply hairpieces and wigs to actors and dancers with so much action,” Friend says. She and her team used Telesis water-resistant adhesive and strong lace tape, as well as anchors and 3-inch pins, to secure the hairpieces. Friend worked with three assistants, with an extra 15 to 20 stylists pitching in when the workload got heavy. Some scenes required 300 to 500 extras, which posed creative challenges as well. “We had to incorporate characters from all walks of life,” Friend says. “Preppies, surfers, punk rockers, mothers and politicians.” ✂ —Karen Ford PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID JAMES, COURTESY OF WARNER BROTHERS PICTURES

Stargazing

Karen Ford

Rock This Way
The new movie musical Rock of Ages explores life on the Sunset Strip when heavy metal was big—and so was the hair.

The club scene of Hollywood, CA’s Sunset Strip in 1987 is the setting for Rock of Ages, the latest Broadway jukebox musical to make its way to the silver screen. Set against a backdrop of drugs, sex and rock ’n’ roll, Rock of Ages tells the story of small-town girl Sherrie Christian, played by Julianne Hough, and busboy Drew Boley (Diego Boneta) as they pursue their dreams of attaining rock stardom and true love. The sound track is populated by songs from iconic ’80s groups like Foreigner, Journey and Twisted Sister, part of a sub-genre often referred to as “hair bands” for reasons which will be obvious to any audience member too young to remember those days.
“In 1987, I was in beauty school in Tempe, AZ,” says the movie’s hair department head Camille Friend. No doubt perms were a big part of the curriculum back then, but no members of the cast, which also includes Tom Cruise, Alec Baldwin, Russell Brand and Catherine Zeta-Jones, had to undergo anything quite so drastic. “We used more than 400 wigs,” Friend says. “Bob Kretschmer did all the custom lace-front wigs for our main cast. We used John Blake wigs for day players and stunts.”
Each character had a distinctive look—some more than one. “Julianne’s character had the most changes,” Friend explains. “She went from farm girl to waitress at a rock bar to stripper and then to rock star. I made many hairpieces, ponytails and extensions to create her looks. We used pictures of Farrah Fawcett and Suzanne Somers as character references.” Cruise plays Stacee Jaxx, a rocker whose look and attitude were inspired by Guns N’ Roses front man Axl Rose. Friend used a three-quarter hairpiece to create volume and add length to Cruise’s natural hair. Mary J. Blige also makes an appearance as a rock diva in a Chaka Khan-inspired Afro wig so big it deserves its own billing.
Much of the action takes place onstage, with the requisite sweating under hot lights and leaping onto amps. Since it’s a musical, even scenes that weren’t at concerts involve lots of dancing, a liability when working with wigs. “It’s always challenging to apply hairpieces and wigs to actors and dancers with so much action,” Friend says. She and her team used Telesis water-resistant adhesive and strong lace tape, as well as anchors and 3-inch pins, to secure the hairpieces.
Friend worked with three assistants, with an extra 15 to 20 stylists pitching in when the workload got heavy. Some scenes required 300 to 500 extras, which posed creative challenges as well. “We had to incorporate characters from all walks of life,” Friend says. “Preppies, surfers, punk rockers, mothers and politicians.” ✂ —Karen Ford

Read the full article at http://www.americansalondigital.com/article/Stargazing/1061181/111308/article.html.

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